6 Questions Reveal What you are REALLY Saying About Your Corporate Culture

A recent blogpost on LearnVest (found here) listed 6 important questions that interviewees should ask when meeting with hiring managers to suss out whether the company is a cultural fit. We think it’s just as important for the company (and in this case that would be our clients) to answer these questions for themselves. Not only will you be prepared to answer them in an interview, but most importantly, you can analyze what these answers really say about your company.

 

What do the answers to these key questions say about your organization?

QUESTION #1: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A GOOD EMPLOYEE IN THIS ROLE AND A FANTASTIC ONE?

QUESTION #2: WHAT’S THE PROCESS FOR ON-BOARDING EMPLOYEES, AND HOW DO YOU HANDLE BEGINNER MISTAKES?

QUESTION #3: WHAT ARE SOME WAYS THE COMPANY FOCUSES ON TEAM DEVELOPMENT?

QUESTION #4: WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT WORKING HERE—AND WHAT DO YOU DISLIKE?

QUESTION #5: WHAT WOULD YOUR EMPLOYEES SAY ARE THE TOP THREE REASONS THEY LOVE WORKING FOR YOU?

QUESTION #6: HOW DOES THIS POSITION SUPPORT THE COMPANY’S MISSION, GOALS AND PROJECTED SUCCESS?

 

Ask yourself these questions before conducting an interview so you truly understand what you’re looking for. The answers won’t just indicate your true corporate culture, but they will also help you realize what it is you really need in a new hire. Take the job search process as an invitation to look at the state of the union at your company. Every time you need to make a critical hire, use that time to analyze, truthfully, how the company as a whole is doing. Did your CMO leave? Instead of just filling the role with the same job spec you used 5 years ago, what are the needs of the company now? How will this position round out the executive team, and is it even a CMO now that you’re after? This is an opportunity for 360 evaluation – don’t miss it by trying to hire quick. Is what you need actually what you are marketing with your job spec? You’ll get what you are asking for, but is it what you need? Evaluate what you think you need with what you really do.